Somalis In Kenya Are Used To Raids, But They Say This Was Different

Mohammed Ali Isaac’s hands shook as he showed his Kenyan ID to the police officers. They let him pass, but his cousins weren’t so lucky. The two women had forgotten their IDs at home, and the police were threatening to load them into one of three large trucks they’d brought for the purpose. Today’s raid, with dozens of armed police officers in the middle of the day in the predominantly Somali neighborhood of Eastleigh in Nairobi, was timed for just after people streamed out of Friday prayers. It was the latest — and perhaps boldest — roundup in a series of police sweeps that have caught up thousands of undocumented refugees, immigrants and Kenyan citizens of Somali descent in recent weeks. “I’m nervous,” Mohammad Ali Isaac admitted. He was waiting with his cousins while they sent another relative back home to pick up the forgotten IDs. If his cousins were arrested, he said, it would be difficult to get them out without a bribe. And bribes, he added, were higher on Friday, when the police could threaten them with a whole weekend in the cell. At age 20, Isaac is already a veteran of the struggle of growing up Somali in Kenya. The community has always felt like outsiders, despite the fact that Kenya is home to hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees, and to many more ethnic Somalis who were born here. “In Eastleigh, we’re used to police operations and police crackdown,” said Ahmed Mohamed, secretary general of the Eastleigh Business District Association, which has 20,000 members. “But this is unprecedented. We’ve never seen such security forces during the daylight and during the Friday prayers.” Wearing his customary blue blazer, Mohamed said he was trying to negotiate with the police commander to stop the arrests, while aiming to quell an increasingly restive crowd.

Mohammed Ali Isaac’s hands shook as he showed his Kenyan ID to the police officers. They let him pass, but his cousins weren’t so lucky. The two women had forgotten their IDs at home, and the police were threatening to load them into one of three large trucks they’d brought for the purpose.

Today’s raid, with dozens of armed police officers in the middle of the day in the predominantly Somali neighborhood of Eastleigh in Nairobi, was timed for just after people streamed out of Friday prayers. It was the latest — and perhaps boldest — roundup in a series of police sweeps that have caught up thousands of undocumented refugees, immigrants and Kenyan citizens of Somali descent in recent weeks.

“I’m nervous,” Mohammad Ali Isaac admitted. He was waiting with his cousins while they sent another relative back home to pick up the forgotten IDs. If his cousins were arrested, he said, it would be difficult to get them out without a bribe. And bribes, he added, were higher on Friday, when the police could threaten them with a whole weekend in the cell.

At age 20, Isaac is already a veteran of the struggle of growing up Somali in Kenya. The community has always felt like outsiders, despite the fact that Kenya is home to hundreds of thousands of Somali refugees, and to many more ethnic Somalis who were born here.

“In Eastleigh, we’re used to police operations and police crackdown,” said Ahmed Mohamed, secretary general of the Eastleigh Business District Association, which has 20,000 members. “But this is unprecedented. We’ve never seen such security forces during the daylight and during the Friday prayers.”

Wearing his customary blue blazer, Mohamed said he was trying to negotiate with the police commander to stop the arrests, while aiming to quell an increasingly restive crowd.

Source:NPR

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